This Week In Music #4 – Manager Andy Gould

I’d had a dinner date with manager Andy Gould on the schedule for a while, since before I knew we’d be shooting episodes of This Week In Music. The plan was to film the show with Nathan Hubbard then head out to dinner with Andy in Venice. Since he’d be coming west anyway, I asked him if he’d mind stopping by the studio for an interview. He said yes, which I greatly appreciated. Since the show didn’t exist yet Andy was (like Nathan before him) really taking a flier and my word that This Week In Music would be anything he’d be remotely interested in being affiliated with. So thanks sincerely, Andy, for agreeing to drop by and chat a bit on camera.

For those who don’t know, Andy is Spectacle Management, currently responsible for Rob Zombie, The Monkees, and some brand new acts. Over the years his roster has included Guns N Roses, Morrissey, Lionel Richie, Danzig, Kool & The Gang and a bunch of other artists we all know and love. Please click above to hear Andy talk about his very first job in the biz (tea-getter for George Martin at Apple Records) and a whole lot more.

I’m just watching this episode and realizing I say “Producer” in the opening! Doh! I’m an idiot. I need a teleprompter. Sorry, Andy!

Quotes!


“So your first job was making tea for The Beatles?”
“For George Martin. It was already 1969, 1970 so…”
“So you were making tea for Badfinger.”
“That’s more true!”

“The power of the business is the manager. It’s being realized now, the manager is more important than the record label. I still believe whenever you see a really successful story, you can trace it back more times to the manager than to the record label. Not to say record labels don’t play an important part, they do…”

“I’m glad for Dr. Luke and whoever manages him but when I see he’s had his 23rd straight #1 record, that’s not good for the business. That’s 23 records that all sound basically the same.”

“If you make it quick you might go away quick. You’ve gotta work. You’ve gotta get those fans one by one.”

“As a manager, never work harder than your act is going to work. If you want it more than they want it for themselves, it won’t work.”

“If you’re given your career by the record label, when the record label decides to move on, you’re fucked.”

“I hated what happened with Amazon and Lady Gaga…”

“I’ve never worked with a band I didn’t love. Even though I don’t work with Axl or Morrissey anymore, I stand by their body of work — they changed the world. And somebody somewhere is playing one of their records as we speak, and it’s getting them through the day. Boy, what a wonderful business to be in. I recommend it.”

Points of clarification:

  • Andy Gould is a Manager, despite my fumbled intro.
  • What I meant about not understanding the point of employment contracts in the music business was that I’ve never understood why everyone in the music biz has “deals” with a long term rather than at-will employment. Is the supply/demand in the music space still such that these are needed?

At the end of the show Lyndsey Parker from Yahoo! Music came by to share one of her favorite summer albums, The Wombats Proudly Present…This Modern Glitch. Check the video at the bottom of this post.

Tune in this Friday at 4pm PT when we’ll talk to VEVO’s CEO Rio Caraeff and Kickstarter’s Yancey Strickler drops by to talk about his favorite summer albums.

Thanks for watching. Please subscribe on iTunes, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter!

ian

Comments

  1. Amy wrote:

    That quote about Dr. Luke is brilliant. Thanks for interviewing Andy, Ian! He’s a really interesting man.

  2. olivier rosset wrote:

    Thanx, I really like the part on Radio. I also do think that playlist concentration was the first real breach in the music business back in the early/mid 90s. England always had been a fresh air , where you could form a band in the basement on monday and get big airplays by saturday ;) then get a deal the following week … Dynamic and reactive market thanx to a national public radio system that created an healthy ecosystem where even privatly owned radios had to take risks by keeping their airwaves very open.

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